Archive for the ‘Diet’ Category

High Fructose Corn Syrup and Obesity


The study conductor(s)top
Bart Hoebel, Professor of Psychology, Princeton Neuroscience Institute
The participant(s)top
TKEM Lab Rats
Date study concludedtop
March 22, 2010
Funded bytop
Princeton Neuroscience Institute
Purposetop

To determine if a link exists between high-fructose corn syrup consumption and obesity when compared with sugar.

Summarytop

The experiment found that rats consuming high-fructose corn syrup were much more likely to become obese and have various health problems, especially with cholesterol.

Methods usedtop

In an initial experiment, Hoebel and colleagues from the Princeton Neuroscience Institute gave male rats water sweetened with either high-fructose corn syrup or sucrose (standard table sugar) in addition to their standard diet of rat feed. The concentration of sugar was roughly the same as that found in commercial sodas, while the concentration of high-fructose corn syrup was half that found in soda.

Resultstop

The study, published online in the journal Pharmacology, Biochemistry and Behavior, found that, not only did rats consuming high-fructose corn syrup gain more weight than those eating sugar, but they also had abnormal increases in body fat, particularly in the abdomen and in the form of elevated triglyceride levels in the blood. In a second experiment, researchers tracked weight gain, body fat and triglycerides in rats eating only rat feed, compared with those regularly consuming high-fructose corn syrup. Researchers found that, compared with those on a standard rat diet, those eating the high-fructose corn syrup gained significantly more weight, and had higher concentrations of body fat and triglycerides, symptoms in keeping with what is known as metabolic syndrome in humans. Male rats in particular put on a significant amount of excess weight during the six-month study, gaining 48% more weight than those on the standard diet.

Notestop

[+] This study has been peer reviewed and validated by various researchers from Princeton.

External Sourcestop
http://www.princeton.edu/main/news/archive/S26/91/22K07/
http://wellness.blogs.time.com/2010/03/23/study-high-fructose-corn-syrup-causes-more-weight-gain/
APA Citation(s)top
High Fructose Corn Syrup and Obesity. (2010).
   Retrieved August 16, 2017, from Public Studies Web site:
   http://www.publicstudies.com/main/2010/03/high-fructose-corn-syrup-and-obesity/
MLA Citation(s)top
“High Fructose Corn Syrup and Obesity”
   Public Studies. 22 March 2010.
   August 16, 2017. <http://www.publicstudies.com/main/2010/03/high-fructose-corn-syrup-and-obesity/>.

Blood Glucose Response


The study conductor(s)top
Public Studies
The participant(s)top
1 Caucasian Male (control)
Date study concludedtop
October 1, 2009
Funded bytop
Public Studies (publicstudies.com)
Purposetop

To demonstrate the base changes certain foods have on blood glucose level for a single individual while categorizing the foods, as it is suggested that the blood glucose response helps dictate a person’s weight gain, but that is for another study.

Summarytop

This study tests the blood glucose response of certain foods in a single individual (for control). Refined carbohydrates seem to produce the highest level of blood glucose response, these include but are not limited to: white bread; wholegrain bread; potatoes; sugar. The highest changes were seen with sugar (raising an average of 53 points, as opposed to 5 points which a carrot causes) and breads.

Methods usedtop

Standard measurements with a +/-5 accuracy blood meter, obtained 3 times per reading (three separate fingers) and averaged. For three readings taken immediately after 8 hours of sleep, second reading taken at 15 minutes after eating, third reading taken 1 hour after eating.

Resultstop

Results:

Food Portion Pre 15 Min 1 Hour H Difference
White Bread 1 slice 97 125 117 28
Wholegrain Rye Bread 1 slice 98 123 115 25
Pizza 1 slice 98 122 118 24
(Breaburn) Apple 1 medium 97 106 101 9
Notestop
  • [-] This study is specific for the individual, while these results may correlate with others, it is not intended to be a guide of any sort.
  • [_] Only enzyme treated (commonly found in store bought breads in the US) was used, there may be different results for non-enzyme treated bread.
External Sourcestop
Public Studies Original
APA Citation(s)top
Blood Glucose Response. (2009).
   Retrieved August 16, 2017, from Public Studies Web site:
   http://www.publicstudies.com/main/2009/10/blood-glucose-response/
MLA Citation(s)top
“Blood Glucose Response”
   Public Studies. 1 October 2009.
   August 16, 2017. <http://www.publicstudies.com/main/2009/10/blood-glucose-response/>.

Low Carb, Mediterranean, and Low Fat diet results.


The study conductor(s)top
Investigator: Dr. Meir Stampfer, (co-chair of Brigham and Women’s Hospital’s Channing Laboratory in Boston, Mass.); Researchers: various individuals at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev in Israel.
The participant(s)top
322 obese adults
Date study concludedtop
June 1, 2008
Funded bytop
Ben-Gurion University of the Negev in Israel
Purposetop

To determine which diet (if any) provides the best health benefits coupled with weight (fat) loss in obese people.

Summarytop

Individuals on a low-carb diest lost 12 pounds, those on a Mediterranean diet lost 10 lbs, and those on a low-fat diet lost 7 pounds.

Methods usedtop

Individuals were split up and placed on three different diet regimens for two years: a low-carb diet, a low-fat diet, and a Mediterranean diet. Their weight and health readings (cholesterol, blood sugar/a1c) were sampled before and after the study. The low-carb diet was less than 40 grams of carbohydrates per day, the Mediterranean diet consisted of high levels of vegetables, fruit, fish and poultry, medium levels of whole grains, low levels of red meat and dairy, and very low levels of sugar. The low-fat diet was 30% of calories from fat, as recommended by the America Heart Association.

Resultstop

The highest weight loss was seen with the low-carb diet (12 lbs), and then in the Mediterranean diet (10 lbs), and lastly in the low-fat diet (7 lbs). Researchers found that a low-fat diet also bestowed the least health benefits on the dieters compared with the Mediterranean and low-carb diets. Those on the Mediterranean diet were most likely to have improvements in blood sugar levels, while those on the low carb diet had the most improvement in cholesterol levels.

Notestop
  • Rather than a traditional low-fat diet which designates that only 10 percent of calories should be derived from fat — researchers assigned subjects in the low-fat diet group to a plan based on the American Heart Association guidelines, which derives 30 percent of its calories from fat.
External Sourcestop
http://abcnews.go.com/Health/Diet/story?id=5389423&page=1
APA Citation(s)top
Low Carb, Mediterranean, and Low Fat diet results.. (2008).
   Retrieved August 16, 2017, from Public Studies Web site:
   http://www.publicstudies.com/main/2008/06/low-carb-med/
MLA Citation(s)top
“Low Carb, Mediterranean, and Low Fat diet results.”
   Public Studies. 1 June 2008.
   August 16, 2017. <http://www.publicstudies.com/main/2008/06/low-carb-med/>.

White Bread, Sugary Cereals and Health Problems


The study conductor(s)top
Lead Author: Alan Barclay (University of Sydney)
The participant(s)top
2 million people (from 37 peer reviewed diet studies)
Date study concludedtop
March 1, 2008
Funded bytop
University of Sydney, Australia
Purposetop

To determine a common food that contributes to health problems.

Summarytop

The study found that high GI foods (potatoes, white bread, sugar) increase occurrences of certain types of cancer, type 2 diabetes, and heart disease.

Methods usedtop

The researchers critically analyzed the results from 37 diet studies and mapped health issues with the types of foods consumed.

Resultstop

The results found a link between a high GI (Glycemic Index) diet consisting of highly processed foods and a high risk of type 2 diabetes and heart disease. The diet was also linked to gall stones and some types of cancer. Lead author Alan Barclay said the link with diabetes was “not surprising” because high GI foods raise blood glucose and insulin levels. High GI foods cause constant spikes in blood glucose which increase insulin and a related substance called ‘insulin-like growth factor one’, both of which have been shown to increase the risk of developing cancer.

Notestop
  • [+]This study contains a massive(>100,000) sample size.
  • [+]This study was peer reviewed prior to entering the Public Studies database.
External Sourcestop
http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,336390,00.html | American Journal of Clinical Nutrition | http://www.news.com.au/story/0,23599,23349006-36398,00.html
APA Citation(s)top
White Bread, Sugary Cereals and Health Problems. (2008).
   Retrieved August 16, 2017, from Public Studies Web site:
   http://www.publicstudies.com/main/2008/03/white-bread-sugary-cereals-and-health-problems/
MLA Citation(s)top
“White Bread, Sugary Cereals and Health Problems”
   Public Studies. 1 March 2008.
   August 16, 2017. <http://www.publicstudies.com/main/2008/03/white-bread-sugary-cereals-and-health-problems/>.